Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Saturday, November 11, 2017

In 2016, the overall rate of reported chlamydia cases among blacks in the United States was 1,125.9 cases per 100,000 population

The rate of reported chlamydia cases among black women was 5.1 times the rate among white women (1,387.2 and 271.1 cases per 100,000 females, respectively). The rate of reported chlamydia cases among black men was 6.6 times the rate among white men (839.0 and 126.4 cases per 100,000 males, respectively). Rates of reported cases of chlamydia were highest for blacks aged 15–19 and 20–24 years in 2016. The rate of reported chlamydia cases among black women aged 15–19 years (6,485.2 cases per 100,000 females) was 4.5 times the rate among white women in the same age group (1,433.3 cases per 100,000 females). The rate of reported chlamydia cases among black women aged 20–24 years was 3.7 times the rate among white women in the same age group (6,747.6 and 1,836.2 cases per 100,000 females, respectively). Similar racial disparities in reported chlamydia rates exist among men. Among men aged 15–19 years, the rate of reported chlamydia cases among blacks was 8.8 times the rate among whites (2,337.7 and 266.9 cases per 100,000 males, respectively). The rate of reported chlamydia cases among black men aged 20–24 years was 4.9 times the rate among white men of the same age group (3,316.9 and 682.5 cases per 100,000 males, respectively).

Friday, November 10, 2017

Do hateful words lead to unspeakable crimes?

The Weimar Republic tried to restrict the free speech rights of the Nazis. The Nazi party had 200 prosecutions brought against it for anti-Semitic speech. At one point the state of Bavaria issued an order banning Hitler from giving public speeches.

Jewish sex predator update: An Emmy-winning writer for AMC's Mad Men once thought her award would solidify a successful career path, but she was let go from the show a year later — and she's now accusing show creator Matthew Weiner of sexual harassment

Kater Gordon, who started as Weiner's personal assistant in 2007 before becoming a writers' assistant, said that she was working late one night with Weiner co-writing the show's season finale, an episode that won them both an Emmy in 2009. She said during their session, Weiner remarked that she owed it to him to let him see her naked, a comment she just let fade before continuing to work on the script with him. But the months that followed left her feeling "threatened and devalued," though she didn't report the incident because she said that she wanted the writing credit for that episode to help get her another job. "I saw no value to speaking out," she said. "So I did what I thought women were supposed to do." She said that she "lost respect" for Weiner, and a longtime writer on the show said "I could see her confidence was shaken" after the incident. Just weeks after her Emmy win, Weiner let Gordon go, rattling off a list of ways she'd "fallen short" on the job, she said. In a statement from his rep, Weiner said that he spent "eight to 10 hours a day" holed up working with Gordon, but he notes he doesn't remember making that remark and insists he had "a predominantly female driven writers room [and] has long believed in and implemented an egalitarian working environment." Gordon fell out of Hollywood after that and went on instead to found Modern Alliance, a nonprofit for sexual harassment victims. She said that she was "inspired" to speak out after hearing Harvey Weinstein stories.